Seguici su acebook facebook Cerca nel sito:

Le ricerche di Gerona 2005

(25-10-2017) Escapism is bad for kids mentally, emotionally, physically: Parents should remove electronics if they want to improve health, behavior, g




(Natural News) Parents should be aware of another boogeyman in the closet. A team of researchers from the Iowa State University are concluding that placing a TV along with a gaming console in a child’s bedroom could result in developmental and social problems later on. The effect is not a correlation but a relationship; meaning that while playing video games does not directly lead to a problematic child, the likelihood of sociopathy are increased. The trigger, it would seem, is location. More so than any other area of the home, the bedroom can provide a haven for children to engage in more violent, less educational video games.
As explained by lead author and professor of psychology Douglas Gentile on Science Daily: “Putting a TV in the bedroom gives children 24-hour access and privatizes it in a sense, so as a parent you monitor less and control their use of it less.”
It is a classic case of ripples in the water. Gentile argues that when children are given free reign to computer or video games, they spend less time reading, socializing, or playing outside. Using data from his other studies, Gentile says that the number of hours children spend in front of a screen has significantly increased in only a few short years. He insists that children in our country spend nearly 60 hours a week in front of a computer. To put that into perspective, an average white-collar worker is only required to spend 40 hours a week doing his or her job.
Other studies paint a far bleaker picture. National research concludes that more than 40 percent of our children (ages four to six) have a TV in their bedroom. Children above the age of six typically have a video game console with their television set.
While there are no studies available that show the type of video games being played by children in their bedrooms as compared to in any other space in their home, Gentile says that it is likely that these games are not entirely appropriate. He claims that digital media use has molded children to believe that their “life” is the one being portrayed in their device rather than what is actually happening. Today’s children, he says, are more concerned about responding to text messages at night or social media alerts than listening to their parents or doing their homework.
Gentile pleads for parents to take his findings with grim-faced practicality. Children may fight to keep their “privacy” in having their own TV in their bedroom, but the effects of having one are only harmful. Bedrooms should be bedrooms: Areas that kids use to sleep and relax.
“It’s a lot easier for parents to never allow a TV in the bedroom than it is to take it out,” Gentile concludes. “It’s a question every parent must face, but there is a simple two-letter answer. That two-letter answer is tough, but it is worth it.”
Limit video game use in any case
Video games have the mental nutritional profile of a Twinkie. These games are exciting, visually-appealing, and most importantly, addicting. Children raised with video games often have anti-social characteristics and can engage in escapist tendencies. There is also the sense of detached self-importance. Players — especially those in role-playing games — are the heroes or heroines of the story; the shining knight that saves the world through relentlessly butchering, robbing, and manipulating less-important characters in this made-up world (the jargon, parents should know, is NPC: non-player character). Children learn at an early age that they are the core on which the universe revolves andthat they are not responsible for their actions. (Related: Violent Video Games and Certain Internet Use Cause Aggression and Other Negative Outcomes.)
Mental health professionals recommend limiting video game use to only one hour a day, particularly for younger children. Parents should also take the pains to encourage their children to play with other kids their age, or participate in other helpful activities such as reading.

Sources include:
ScienceDaily.com 1
ScienceDaily.com 2

News

  • (15-12-2017) The health of your gut microbiome could predict your risk of heart disease, researchers find

    Leggi tutto

  • (15-12-2017) Le cellule del colon proliferano con l’obesità

    Leggi tutto

  • (15-12-2017) Healthy gut bacteria can protect you from just about ANY age-related disease, new study finds

    Leggi tutto

  • (15-12-2017) Donne in menopausa: i benefici dell’acqua gassata

    Leggi tutto

  • (14-12-2017) The effects of dietary protein intake on appendicular lean mass and muscle function in elderly men: a 10-wk randomized controlled trial.

    Leggi tutto

  • (14-12-2017) FDA torna indietro su benefici cardiaci delle proteine della soia

    Leggi tutto

  • (14-12-2017) A high-glycemic diet is associated with cerebral amyloid burden in cognitively normal older adults.

    Leggi tutto

  • (14-12-2017) Tè verde e tè nero in aiuto per perdere peso

    Leggi tutto

  • (13-12-2017) Breast milk the new CANCER cure? Scientists discover tumor-destroying molecules with astonishing properties

    Leggi tutto

  • (13-12-2017) Pressione alta: il rischio si riduce facendo spesso la sauna

    Leggi tutto

  • (13-12-2017) The brain and immune system prompt energy shortage in chronic inflammation and ageing.

    Leggi tutto

  • (13-12-2017) Ragazzini, già obesi e ossidati

    Leggi tutto

  • (12-12-2017) Nutrients in apples and grapes found to increase stamina

    Leggi tutto

  • (12-12-2017) Cancro al colon: attività fisica intensa rilascia molecola preventiva

    Leggi tutto

  • (12-12-2017) Association Between Adipokines Levels with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Systematic Reviews.

    Leggi tutto

  • (11-12-2017) Anche in giovane età il rischio di morte è molto maggiore in presenza di diabete

    Leggi tutto

  • (11-12-2017) Sugar industry sponsorship of germ-free rodent studies linking sucrose to hyperlipidemia and cancer: An historical analysis of internal documents

    Leggi tutto

  • (11-12-2017) Diabete e obesità: in un anno hanno provocato 800.000 nuovi casi di tumore

    Leggi tutto

  • (11-12-2017) Vitamin D Deficiency

    Leggi tutto

  • (10-12-2017) Malattie infiammatorie intestinali. Forte legame con l’industrializzazione

    Leggi tutto

  • (10-12-2017) Circulating vitamin D concentration and age-related macular degeneration: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Leggi tutto

  • (10-12-2017) Cuore a rischio per troppo zucchero

    Leggi tutto

  • (10-12-2017)n Memory and sleep: Researchers finally discover why getting sufficient sleep dramatically boosts brain performance

    Leggi tutto


In evidenza

"L'informazione presente nel sito serve a migliorare, e non a sostituire, il rapporto medico-paziente."

Per coloro che hanno problemi di salute si consiglia di consultare sempre il proprio medico curante.

Informazioni utili